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Old 29th November 2008, 05:13   #11
hockey_rocks
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Default Re: Cheap ground cover

Alright so here's the how-to on coloring the ground covering.

1. First you need a spray bottle of which I used a vim cleaning bottle as is pictured.



2. Next get a can or jar and fill with water along with mixing in some arcylic paint I have only tried green paint so far but will try out some browns and so on. Once you have your paint mixed together well pour it into your spray bottle.



3. Now you begin spraying in this case I suggest you have a larger box or bucket to keep from making a mess, spray the surface of the foam, mix it up a little and continue doing this untill it is the color you want. The nice part is, is that you don't need to let it dry for long at all, it will only be slightly damp. Here's how it turned out for me, on the right is what it used to look like and the left is how it turned out.




Hope you like it! If you happen to try my method I would like to hear how it turned out.
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Old 29th November 2008, 07:55   #12
frank47
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Default Re: Cheap ground cover

Great work and thanks for the how to and its also great to see that you are using the chat room.
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Old 29th November 2008, 19:01   #13
hockey_rocks
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Thanks Frank, yeah and I really enjoyed the chat room
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Old 17th January 2010, 21:11   #14
Roy Buchanan
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Default Re: Cheap ground cover

Love this idea. Off to WallyWorld to pick some up.
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Old 1st July 2010, 05:00   #15
Santa Fe SDA
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Default Re: Cheap ground cover

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Originally Posted by hockey_rocks View Post
So I came up with this new, easy to make and cheap ground cover. Here's the tutorial on how to make the ground cover.

1. First of all you need to buy florists foam (not exactly sure what they call it)
I had bought this block as is pictured for $1.40 can. (the blocks are about 3 in.x4 in.x 8 in.)

2. Once you have bought the foam you can begin crushing it in a bucket or box.

3. You can then go on crushing it with your hands untill there are no chunks.

4. And there you have it! Ground cover! (3 blocks equal 16 cups of ground cover after crushing)



Hope you all like! I would like to hear what you think and also if you have any advice.

I'll post some pics later on of the trees that I will make using the ground cover.
This looks like just what I need. I'm doing a park, so bright green is probably going to work for me. My next question is how do I make it stick to my layout? How about paint? Can I use paint as an adhesive? I thought I read something like that here. I've barely touched the gallon of paint I bought for the layout, and it's a lovely brown color. I've posted pictures of it on this site so no need to post another one here. I think the green foam and the brown paint will make a nice combination. What do you think?
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Old 7th July 2010, 03:30   #16
Santa Fe SDA
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Default Re: Cheap ground cover

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Originally Posted by hockey_rocks View Post
Alright so here's the how-to on coloring the ground covering.

1. First you need a spray bottle of which I used a vim cleaning bottle as is pictured.



2. Next get a can or jar and fill with water along with mixing in some arcylic paint I have only tried green paint so far but will try out some browns and so on. Once you have your paint mixed together well pour it into your spray bottle.



3. Now you begin spraying in this case I suggest you have a larger box or bucket to keep from making a mess, spray the surface of the foam, mix it up a little and continue doing this untill it is the color you want. The nice part is, is that you don't need to let it dry for long at all, it will only be slightly damp. Here's how it turned out for me, on the right is what it used to look like and the left is how it turned out.




Hope you like it! If you happen to try my method I would like to hear how it turned out.
This looks like a fabulous idea and I'm going to try it. I've got about five square yards/meters to cover so I'd better get started.

I just have one more question. In step 2 when you mix the acrylic paint and water, how much water do you use? It looks like you've got about equal parts paint and water. Am I right?
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Old 7th July 2010, 03:32   #17
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Looks like a great idea thanks for posting. Will have to go out and buy the wife some flowers and insist that they are in the green stuff.
Everybody wins!
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Old 7th July 2010, 15:39   #18
Roy Buchanan
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Default Re: Cheap ground cover

I've used both the green and brown with different acrylic paint to come up with a variety of colours. I must also note that I've used soft cushion foam to make a lumpier low shrub ground cover as well with various colours.

In both cases I used an old blender. The flourist foam can be ground down to a fine powder. The soft foam just won't grind down as fine.

Some learning points:

a. The foam must be cut up into pieces about half an inch.

b. The foam will not initially sink down to the blades, you must use a soft stick to coerse the chunks down. Use care and go slow.

c. At the start I use a low speed.

d. Grinding foam will create a lot of static. Use a bit to "wet" water to eliminate this. I soak about every sixth piece. By doing this you will be able to keep the lid of the blender off to guide the material down the center to the blades.

e. Once the material is starting to move up the sides and then fall into the center on its own I add the acrylic paint. Not a lot is needed. I add a few good squirts at first and then add more if I want the colour to be darker or deeper.

f. Once satisfied with the colour place the ground foam into a large pan to dry.

g. Grinding foam creates heat and you will have to allow the material to cool down as you grind. Taking the container off the blender and shaking the material around and them regrinding helps to work larger pieces into the blades and also allows the material to cool down. My guide is that when I see steam coming off the material or the container feels very hot, then I shake up the contents and wait a few minutes for some of the heat to dissipate before starting up the blender again.

Special note for flower material. I use the white open cell foam here. Only a few small chunks are needed for each colour you want seeing as you are only going to sprinkle tiny bits in areas where you want to simulate flowers. So far I've done white, yellow, red and blue. I figure a tablespoon of ground foam in each colour will last for years as I only sprinkle a few specks in areas where I want wild flowers.

Hope this helps.

Roy
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Old 8th July 2010, 04:48   #19
Santa Fe SDA
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Default Re: Cheap ground cover

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Originally Posted by Roy Buchanan View Post
I've used both the green and brown with different acrylic paint to come up with a variety of colours. I must also note that I've used soft cushion foam to make a lumpier low shrub ground cover as well with various colours.

In both cases I used an old blender. The flourist foam can be ground down to a fine powder. The soft foam just won't grind down as fine.

Some learning points:

a. The foam must be cut up into pieces about half an inch.

b. The foam will not initially sink down to the blades, you must use a soft stick to coerce the chunks down. Use care and go slow.

c. At the start I use a low speed.

d. Grinding foam will create a lot of static. Use a bit to "wet" water to eliminate this. I soak about every sixth piece. By doing this you will be able to keep the lid of the blender off to guide the material down the center to the blades.

e. Once the material is starting to move up the sides and then fall into the center on its own I add the acrylic paint. Not a lot is needed. I add a few good squirts at first and then add more if I want the colour to be darker or deeper.

f. Once satisfied with the colour place the ground foam into a large pan to dry.

g. Grinding foam creates heat and you will have to allow the material to cool down as you grind. Taking the container off the blender and shaking the material around and them regrinding helps to work larger pieces into the blades and also allows the material to cool down. My guide is that when I see steam coming off the material or the container feels very hot, then I shake up the contents and wait a few minutes for some of the heat to dissipate before starting up the blender again.

Special note for flower material. I use the white open cell foam here. Only a few small chunks are needed for each colour you want seeing as you are only going to sprinkle tiny bits in areas where you want to simulate flowers. So far I've done white, yellow, red and blue. I figure a tablespoon of ground foam in each colour will last for years as I only sprinkle a few specks in areas where I want wild flowers.

Hope this helps.

Roy
I'm loving this idea!

The one major flaw I'm seeing is that I don't have a blender. I thought I read someplace that the foam can be scraped with a dull knife and then crushed. I think I can handle that. I can't wait to get started.
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Old 9th July 2010, 02:40   #20
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Talking Re: Cheap ground cover

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I'm loving this idea!

The one major flaw I'm seeing is that I don't have a blender. I thought I read someplace that the foam can be scraped with a dull knife and then crushed. I think I can handle that. I can't wait to get started.
The way to get a blender is to get married. That should net you at least 2; one for upstairs and one for the railway.
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