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Old 4th September 2005, 02:56   #1
disisme
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Default layout design terminology

This thread is intended as a bit of a tutorial on what things are called on a layout.¬* While its not a total list of things, hopefully it will help some people come to terms when reading other posts throughout this forum.¬* I'm not saying that any of the examplke pictures are good practice or noto, but simply to give an idea of terminilogy :

First, we have a conventional yard, with the yard throat (entry from the mainline) and switching lead (the piece of track the switcher uses to 'dismantle' trains) being one and the same.¬* This is also the 'arrival and departure track'.¬* The engine pocket is where the switcher 'hides' to allow mainline trains to access the yard throat.




Second, we havea¬* reverse yard.¬* The switching lead is actually at the end of the arrival / departure track, and isnt a common track.¬* The ladder tracks, therefore, face backwards against the direction mainline trains enter the yard. This is a pic of jpguests plan. You can see the reverse yard where all the colors are :



The third one is a more complex yard with arrival and departure tracks,¬* a seperate switching lead, and a caboose track.


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Old 22nd October 2005, 10:37   #2
Tileguy
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Default Re: layout design terminology

In the above photo the track called Runaround would also be known as the Escape track.
Locomotives can escape to the service area and either a new engine from the ready track (engine pocket) can be attached or if thier is time during the layover and you have a yard with excellent turnaround time ( Like UP's Midwest Terminal),The same locomotive could then be used.

Other tracks to consider would be Service tracks for coal,oil,water and sand(possibly a wash rack), A team track (for freight service) A RIP track (repair in place) for servicing cars that blew a hose or a shoe (something simple), and perhaps an interchange track where cars would be exchanged with another Railroad.
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Old 22nd August 2006, 19:11   #3
Triplex
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Default Re: layout design terminology

This is all US terminology (which I use). However, it's different in the UK. A "switching lead" is called a "headshunt". The other terms are probably the same, except "caboose track".
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Old 5th January 2007, 16:11   #4
hartleymartin
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Default Re: layout design terminology

There are numerous differences between UK and US terminology, and I am sure that many countries borrow from both. A page of terms covering different systems and showing same/similar meanings would be useful to us I suppose, considering that this is an international forum.
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