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Old 5th August 2011, 22:46   #1
Chevron
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Join Date: Aug 2011
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Default First timer

Hi all, Just a quick post to hi.
I bought my first train set last week and im in to photography, with a canon 450d.
Still new to both and will be building my model railway for photography and enjoyment reason.

Here is a quick picture from the set straight out of the box, I know most photography is done with a high F stop but this was done with a low F stop to blur the wagon.

Your thought would be helpful as its my first time trying model railway photography.
With it being a steamer i thought sepia might be better instead of color due to the track mat colors.



Cheers
Danny
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Old 6th August 2011, 19:28   #2
Chock
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Default Re: First timer

Hi and welcome to the forum.

Were you photographing it as a model, or attempting to make it look more like the real thing? If it was the latter, you'll probably be wanting a larger depth of field. Another thing worth trying, is to get the camera lower in order to emulate being at the height of a person at that scale, which will tend to make the thing look more realistic. Of course it is not always possible to get the camera very low down, but what you can do instead is shoot level and then crop out the top, which gets a similar effect. Adding some noise or film grain in Photoshop or similar also tends to make things look more convincing and of course with Photoshop or some other similar editing software, you can clone out things which give it away as being a model, such as the coupler on the front of the loco. Another thing to try with railway photography, is to get the railway line to come out of the shot at the corner of the frame, which has the effect of drawing the viewer's eye into the shot, which can often enhance L compositions if you are using the rule of thirds.

Al
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Old 7th August 2011, 18:45   #3
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Default Re: First timer

Thanks Chock for the great reply.
a lot to think about.

Q. Were you photographing it as a model, or attempting to make it look more like the real thing?
A. Well i was trying to combine the 2 to try make the model look more realistic.

Q.Another thing worth trying, is to get the camera lower in order to emulate being at the height of a person at that scale, which will tend to make the thing look more realistic.
A. my chin was on the floor looking through the viewfinder, Might try have it on a table next time to get the level better.

Q. Adding some noise or film grain in Photoshop or similar also tends to make things look more convincing
A. I was thinking along those kinda of lines that's why i thought sepia. Didn't think of grain tho.

Q. you can clone out things which give it away as being a model, such as the coupler on the front of the loco.
A. Not a fan of cloning things out (partially because I'm terrible at it.)

Q.with railway photography, is to get the railway line to come out of the shot at the corner of the frame.
A. i thought i had the framing right for this, I will try placing the track in the corner more next time if its on a curve.


I have a lot to learn in photography and railway models, and i hope to learn a lot from browsing these forums.

Cheers
Danny
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Old 7th August 2011, 23:33   #4
Chock
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Default Re: First timer

The trick with cloning in Photoshop is to drop the opacity and flow settings for the brush to about 50 percent and to use a soft edged brush. This allows you to use more than one source point instead of staying with the same one for the entire edit. That way, you gradually get rid of the bits you want to lose and avoid an obvious 'rubber stamp' effect; a useful keyboard shortcut when doing that stuff is the left and right square bracket keys, which will let you adjust the brush size on the fly - left square bracket for a smaller brush, right one for a bigger brush.

You can work wonders with a bit of cloning and filter application in Photoshop, to prove it, here's a quick pic I took and a very quick tweaked version of it in PS, I created the clouds by cloning and smudging bits of what was already on the photo. Notice the slight image crop to put the rail in a position where it goes out of the frame right in the corner, to help lead the viewer's eye into the shot. I also ramped up the contrast a bit to help create the illusion of strong sunlight and noised the image up a bit with the filters to lose the 'plastic model' look:





Anyway, be sure to post more of your pics, I thought your first one was pretty good actually. If you want some good Photoshop tutorials, take a look here by the way: www.hongkiat.com

Al
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